Holy Chicken!

the ask

Help Morgan Spurlock brand and design a fast food chicken restaurant.

the RESULTS

A grand opening pop-up store that sold out in just four days.

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Too Good To Be True!
When the creator of Supersize Me asked us to help him launch his new fast food experiment, we said Cluck Yeah. Holy Chicken! was designed with all the high gloss of slick, green-washed fast-casual restaurants, but with an underlying message that the fast-cheap-delicious combo really is too good to be true.
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Too Good To Be True!
When the creator of Supersize Me asked us to help him launch his new fast food experiment, we said Cluck Yeah. Holy Chicken! was designed with all the high gloss of slick, green-washed fast-casual restaurants, but with an underlying message that the fast-cheap-delicious combo really is too good to be true.
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swatch-wood
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The Part Where We Brag

  • Over 1 million views in the first week
  • 100 million+ PR impressions
  • Voted AdWeek’s Ad of the Week
  • Won AdAge’s Small Agency Integrated Campaign of the Year
  • Currently the Save the Bros video is up to 7M views. (88% of which are organic)
  • 20 million total Brononymous views on Youtube and Facebook

  • 150,000 campaign shares
  • More than 15,000 Brononymous tweets
  • 125,000 site visits
  • 25,000 coupon views
The Brononymous Hotline was Nominated for a Webby, for best digital advertising campaign, punching well above its weight alongside the biggest brands in the world.
“For Organic Valley to show an edgy sense of humor breaks new ground for organic product advertising.”

Mashable

“Luckily, we have enough of a sense of humor around here that we actually enjoyed this video from Organic Valley....Yum. Go big or go home. And Save The Bros.”

Bro Bible

“In other words, for an ad that, at moments, panders to its target by trolling everyone else, it's pretty funny—deftly sending up cheesy public-service tropes, while also largely poking fun at the consumers it's trying to woo. ”

Adweek

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